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SOC 3811/5811: Synchronous Class - Shared screen with speaker view
John R Warren
39:20
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1e-fvBNcaVp8UVjNRGvBEJ6OtSy-68cSV/view?usp=sharing
Marianne V Reilly
53:19
no
Julia Grove
53:35
we got through the first slide
Marianne V Reilly
56:01
wait can you back up on the z score
Sara McClendon
56:12
^^
Ashley Ochoa
56:32
how did you determine the z score?
Marianne V Reilly
56:47
I still can't figure out how you got the z table
Morgan Reed
56:49
Can we just use the T table to find the confidence intervals? They’re stated at the bottom
Jaden Lubarski
56:52
Is it ok to use the last column on the t-table to find the multiplier?
Madlyn J Ott
57:16
Does it always have to be 10%
Marianne V Reilly
57:24
me too
Jake
57:29
I used the t-table and got 1.28 as well…so I think you can?
Idman Adan
57:39
No it depends on the confidence interval
Neeraj Rajasekar
57:52
So, "Yes and No" is the technical answer. I think we'll get to the why of the T vs Z table kinda stuff later
Marianne V Reilly
58:49
wait I am still lost
Jacob E Lanning
58:50
RIP I did that part wrong sorry group
James Peterson
58:57
No worries
Alexandra Aurelius
59:11
how did you decide to use .08?
Morgan Reed
59:34
Definitely easier
Neeraj Rajasekar
59:49
80% came from the question. We'll do 95% next.
Idman Adan
01:00:04
So you want 80% in the middle. 20% is left to get to 100%. That means on either side of the 80% there is .10 or 10%. You look for the number on the Z table closest to 10 percent to find the multiplier.
Neeraj Rajasekar
01:00:16
Idman is correct.
Madlyn J Ott
01:00:48
so if there is 5% left would that mean 2.5% on each side of 95%?
Idman Adan
01:00:57
yes
De Andre T Beadle
01:00:59
yes
Ashley Ochoa
01:01:12
would you be able to go a little slower?
Neeraj Rajasekar
01:01:23
We're gonna do the same thing twice here if that helps
Kathryn M Meenan
01:05:21
it was really hard to see the figure on the powerpoint once you sent us to breakout rooms
Jacob E Lanning
01:05:37
You an hit the magnifying glass to zoom in
Jacob E Lanning
01:05:43
can*
Sara McClendon
01:08:12
can you slow down a little? I cant keep up with writing it out
Hayat Muse
01:08:15
In the homework when I subtracted P2 from p1 I got a negative number, what do we do in these cases?
Nia G Steinhagen
01:08:38
id really appreciate it a little slower as well
Neeraj Rajasekar
01:08:47
It comes down to the sentence where you write out the interpretation
Ryan A Moon
01:08:56
It doesn’t matter if its negative or positive, just interpretation
Neeraj Rajasekar
01:08:58
Negative numbers still indicate a "difference," per se
Kyle Theisen
01:09:30
And when you say "when I do the math," would you do the math lol
Ashley Ochoa
01:10:04
I got lost after he circled the answer
Ashley Ochoa
01:10:14
can you go over that?
Marianne V Reilly
01:12:31
how do you enter (+-) into a calculator?
Neeraj Rajasekar
01:12:43
+- means "two numbers"
Neeraj Rajasekar
01:12:53
do a simple A + B, then again with A - B
Kyle Theisen
01:12:53
It just means the positive and the negative of the same number
Neeraj Rajasekar
01:13:06
doesn't require a fancy number. it's a math symbol which means "add AND substract"
Kyle Theisen
01:14:08
Sample Size?
Morgan Reed
01:14:11
Larger sample size
Alexandra Aurelius
01:16:09
so you can get a negative percentage but we’re to treat it as an absolute value?
Neeraj Rajasekar
01:16:40
More or less, Yes. BUT only relevant when comparing two sub populations (Dems and GOP, for example)
Neeraj Rajasekar
01:17:00
Because the negative percentage's sign is less important than its magnitude, per se
Hayat Muse
01:18:02
Can I get reassigned? I was in a group by myself
Marianne V Reilly
01:18:31
Me Too
Jacob E Lanning
01:18:41
Its a glitch its happened in my other classes
Jacob E Lanning
01:18:47
They have to leave and come back
Madelyn L Wolf
01:37:18
Cant we just use the percentages on the last row of the t table to find the z score?
Kyle Theisen
01:37:58
I did a Z distribution because I'm silly, but I got 8.43-8.56
Kathryn M Meenan
01:38:27
in the powerpoint you had given 1.96 for T confidence interval for 95%
Kathryn M Meenan
01:38:52
sorry, I meant the recorded lecture
Jaden Lubarski
01:39:25
Why is the multiplier 2.0 instead of 1.98?
Madelyn L Wolf
01:39:31
Where are you getting the 2
Madelyn L Wolf
01:40:33
Didn’t you do t/2 in the recorded lecture as well when doing differences? Or z/2 I don’t know which one it is
Ian M Gullickson
01:47:26
Thank you!
Leah Zhu
01:47:38
Thank you!